Dragoon Base

Connecting the Troopers of Today with the Veterans of Yesterday.

Very first foot patrol in camp rotz sector, we ran across a chez patrol going in the other direction. My team leader told me to stay in place and lock but not load my M2 submachine gun while he approched them. During those times (1973) we had to keep a peice of green tape over the top of the magizine so the ammo did not fall out, heavan help you if you were short a round when you returned from patrol. To my horor the magizine would not go into the gun becuase of the residue left from the tape. Afterwards we discovered once the mag had been cleaned the top round also had enough residue that it would not chamber.

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One of my more memorable and early border patrols was when I was put on TDY with the Bundes Grenz Schutz and Zollamt . Because of my language skills, I was put on ski patrols in Northern Germany and this Florida boy had to learn cross country skiing the hard way. The germans and I would leave in the morning and in the beginning at night fall I was usually 3 hours behind them at the next camp . They really had a time with me but I eventually caught on.Drank alot of beer, made new friends but I hate cross country skiing to this day.

Years later as a E7 I did a tour short 6 mos stint in Sonthofen, Allgau, translating training manuals on the Fox NBC reconnaisance vehicle (Their NBC School ABC Selbst Shutz Schule)and the pt was cross country skiing whenever snow was on the ground. To this day I hate schlittschulaufen (cross country skiiing).
My first visit to the border was in Nov. of 1980. At this time, I was very green in Germany just have finished basic in Sept. Before, we of Eagle troop just got done with Re-forger and post combat inspection and cleanup. Then we had to test on all the equipment related to our job and (SMLM) card procedures to qualify for border duty. This trip was also my first railhead. To experience railhead at night with all the dangers, noise and rusty chains while being tired, afterwards, to exist at Hof, road-march though downtown towards the camp, and to see this huge radar installation off the distance as we rolled into the compound, that moment is when this border issue started to make a large impression on me that this was serious business. To learn the codebook use (CEOI) and what to do if you were captured or lose it, put chills in me. Then later to wake up in the middle of the night and rush to an alert into the "One K zone".......... That 30 days or so was a whirlwind of information and atmosphere that put a big gut check in this greeny. On Thanksgiving day I was assigned to alert duty and we just got back from the border, we were told that dinner was served so walking around with a mop-suit, we went to the mess-hall were we got this rare really great turkey meal!
I remember once on patrol one of our check points was a gastaus that had the border running a few feet behind it. This place was near Bayer Eisenstein I think, but it was way up a steep dirt road that was difficult to traverse even in the summer. The owner had an elaborate rope and pulley system to get supplies up in the winter. After several tries on one trip in the winter, we made it up! (in jeeps) it was hilarious! Once at the top we went around back where you could see into checholslovakia for miles. At that time a chech patrol came up the path and we were face to face with them!! us on one side and them on the other. All of us panicked (including them) hid our weapons and maps etc. They did reports on us and we did reports on them. Once that was over we all shook hands, one guy gave me his belt buckle and I gave him a pack of good ole' marlboros. I remember this because it scared the crap out of me!! does anyone remember this gasthaus or the name of it? I'm pretty sure it was in the camp May sector but not positive. Gary 76-79
I think it was called the ossler, I could be wrong but your description soundss right.

I remeber the gasthaus Gary but not the name.

Hmmm, Lam, Germany. Our WW II 2d Cav vets know that town well.

I remember one time up on the border and we ran into Czech Guards they wanted to trade belts! The guy took off his belt and motioned for me to do the same thing but once he seen mine he shook his head no and said Hubba Bubba Bubble Gum.

Apparently he got a better belt before and must have gotten Hubba Bubba Bubble Gum before.

Robb 77-79
I remember my first border tour well. I had been in-country for a few weeks so I had THAT bit down, but when we railheaded I just remember getting my hand smashed by one of the track chocks as the chain let go. Then we finally got onboard and into Hof and the whole welter of moving to a (new) post. That night I was on the radar team on the border at the Slab and listened to the little village over the wire partying and playing Niel Diamond loudly. When we finally pulled in to Hof that morning, I saw my first real German officer and got the shock of my life when I saw the Eisenkruetz hanging from his neck. (He was a Major IIRC, but I am not to sure, I just remember clearly saluting aholder of an Iron Cross (probably a 1st Class or low grade Knights Cross).
My first tour was also at Rotz in Feb 78. The patrol was led by SGTs Ricky Patterson & Paul Rutherford. I was such the cruit. I think they had me carrying a M-60 MG and a radio for about 20 ft from the jeep when I found myself in waist deep snow. One of the SGTs said "Get back over here cruit, you're in Czechoslovakia! Lesson learned...
Gary, if its the same place I'm thinking, your mountaintop gasthaus was on the Grosser Osser, and it was in the Camp May Sector (CP 32 or so) . Every other border tour I had was in the friggin' winter & at Rotz

Gary Gray said:
I remember once on patrol one of our check points was a gastaus that had the border running a few feet behind it. This place was near Bayer Eisenstein I think, but it was way up a steep dirt road that was difficult to traverse even in the summer. The owner had an elaborate rope and pulley system to get supplies up in the winter. After several tries on one trip in the winter, we made it up! (in jeeps) it was hilarious! Once at the top we went around back where you could see into checholslovakia for miles. At that time a chech patrol came up the path and we were face to face with them!! us on one side and them on the other. All of us panicked (including them) hid our weapons and maps etc. They did reports on us and we did reports on them. Once that was over we all shook hands, one guy gave me his belt buckle and I gave him a pack of good ole' marlboros. I remember this because it scared the crap out of me!! does anyone remember this gasthaus or the name of it? I'm pretty sure it was in the camp May sector but not positive. Gary 76-79
1971 November I was sent to Camp rotz as a new member of the 4th Armored Division 2nd Squadron 4th Cavalry. I was assigned as a mechanic even though I was a Sheridan trained Armor Creman. I had to work on 12 worn out M151A1 Jeeps and keep them on the road for the Border Patrol. I remeber helping run the canteen at night, running the movies and acting as a bartender. One of the Scout Platon Sergeants put me on the OP and Patrol roster and I ended up doing double duty the norm of the Cavalry. It set me on my course to become a better trooper the rest of my career. I remeber today SHOP, Self Defense, Hostile Act, On Order, or to Prevent illegal Arrest or Capture. SALUTE; Saize, Activity, Location, Unit, Time and Equipment. I remember what a UAZ 69A looks like, Reaction Force, Reaction Platoon, Handicap Blacks and almost everything drilled into my head by those Border Operations Guys.

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8th Colonel of the Regiment Nelson B. Sweitzer 9 Jun 1886 – 29 Oct 1888

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This was the third design of the 2d Cavalry DUI, worn from 1924-1931. The sharp points on the ends of the bottom scroll again called for a redesign.

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